Payday Loans Payday Loans

What positively impressed you:

What positively impressed you:

The hospital, community and students. The admissions director gave alot of good insights. The hospital has a mission of service to the people of Boston. Lots of great clinical opportunities and international opportunities

What positively impressed you:

Boston is one ROCKIN’ city to live in…and the opportunities for clinical care in the first two years of med school are great….the school is located between two huge hospitals and they have a Trauma 1 center.

What positively impressed you:

The interviewers were very friendly and interested in what I had to say. They also did a good job selling the school. The students seem happy and have lives outside of school. Very collegial atmosphere.

What positively impressed you:

The great clinical experience that students get and the access to all different kinds of patient populations. The strict Pass/fail system of the first year. It was kind of cool seeing the anatomy labs, but I don’t know how appropriate it was especially since the faces were uncovered.

What positively impressed you:

Boston is a very fun city to live in. The interview day was very well organized, and faculty members would drop by the conference room where we were waiting, and talk to us about the school. We got to see the anatomy lab, which was very cool. The teaching facilities are all very nice. Lunch was good.

What positively impressed you:

that this school was the most service orientated school named by AMA and that this is an inner city hopital (i want to go into urban healthcare)

What did you wish you had known ahead of time:

The building is not actually on Albany street but behind it, get there early bc they start right at 8am.

What positively impressed you:

the fact that BU is centrally located in between 2 hospitals which were part of a public/private merger

General comments about this interview: In spite of some of what I have heard about BUMC, I was pleasantly surprise on my visit here. The city of Boston in very chic, cool, thriving, and very much a fit for the young professional/student. The curriculum at BU does leave something to be desired- students readily admit that although there are only 4 hours of lecture per day, you still have PBL, grp work and other classroom-based “things” that result in a 8/9 am to 3/4 pm day on most weekdays. However, clinical exposure at BUMC gets a good grade from what I saw, as it starts early in the first year and continues with intensive rotations during your 3rd and 4th years at a public hospital. BUMC also has a strong commitement to social causes and community– at least that what came across and on the surface seems to be that case. One example is the program where students spend time doing home visits for geriatric patients. Whether r not this social concern permeates thru all aspects of the school, I probable could not tell until I was actually a student. To summarize, all-in-all it was a very pleasant experience, and it goes to show that you really do not know if you will like a school until you go for the interview day– the feel in actuality is often so much different from the feel you get on paper. Just like us interviewees I suppose!!

What positively impressed you:

Nice facilites, friendly students, a general sense of satisfaction with the school amongst the BU community. I felt like the administration took time to structure a day that would let interviewees get to know BU. They made sure that we were able to speak to students in both the basic science years and the clinical years, they had faculty members besides our interviewers stop by to answer questions, and they had an organized intro. presentation and a dean who popped in throughout the day to answer questions. They also let you do as much or little as you wanted in the day… go to classes, talk to students/administration or just veg in the lounge. This may be just a coincidence, but I noticed that myself and several of the fellow interviewees were paired with an interviewer with whom we had common interests.

What did you wish you had known ahead of time:

The admissions office is not actually on Albany street, but tucked away behind it.

What positively impressed you:

The tour was really great, very informative, and we got to see a lot. Our tour guide really seemed excited to share his experiences and talk to us about our questions or concerns. It was nice to get information without feeling like you were being evaluated. The dean is just great! He really makes you feel at ease, one of those calming voices, and he is a wonderful speaker. He was happy to hang around and answer our questions when the day was over. The two women from the registrars office were super nice, Loretta and Susan (I think) and they answered questions in a very informal manner. The med students I met seemed like very diverse and interesting people. Also the physicians I met were enthusiastic. This is a great school if you are interested in underserved populations and uninsured patient issues. BU’s hospital serves something like 90% of MA charity care.

What positively impressed you:

The Dean of Admissions gave the best schpiel I’d seen and it was really nice to have a broad sense of the school and its history before heading off to interview and ask questions of students. The students charged with chatting with us at lunch were SUPER nice and down to earth. I wanted to stay and hang out. I was impressed by their public health department and how established their MD/MPH program is. Boston’s awesome.

What did you wish you had known ahead of time:

You need to mail all your undergrad transcripts to BU, so if you can, bring it to your interview so you can just give it to them there. Oh, and the admissions office is NOT at 715 Albany Ave. That is Talbot Hall, the public health building. Go to the School of Medicine building BEHIND Talbot Hall, which is technically located at 80 E. Concord Ave.

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

An ethical question about an orthopedic surgeon who wrote during the early years of the AIDS epidemic. Basically what level of risk is too great when operating on a possibly HIV positive patient.

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

Why President Mbeki of South Africa has such a backward view on HIV and AIDS. (My work deals with South Africa )

Question 1:

Do you have any questions for me?

Question 3:

What areas in medicine are you interested in?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Are you a RedSox fan or a Yankees Fan?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

What personality traits or life experiences have best prepared you to be a physician?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Should university-based research be eliminated?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

What are you expecting to get out of medicine?

Question 2:

What areas of medicine interest you?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

What was the unknown aldehyde and ketone in your Orgo II lab experiment? (I had no idea anymore)

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

Tell me how you would design an Orgo experiement. (My interviewer REALLY loved Orgo)

Question 1:

Describe your clinical experiences.

Question 2:

Why BU?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

So what do you want to talk about? (this was pretty much the only question he asked, and then we proceeded to talk for an hour)

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

Your parents aren’t in medicine – how do they feel about you doing this? (not a difficult question, I just wasn’t prepared for it)

Question 3:

(as I was standing up to leave) So, are there any other schools we’re competing with? (I was caught off guard so my answer was pretty short)

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Don’t you feel you’ll come weak when it comes to competing with other applicants for research positions? ( i’m non-science major)

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

IF you say you have devotion to medicine, why didn’t you get more involved in school? ( the interviewer felt that my volunteer works were miniscule and lack quality)

Question 1:

Your services don’t quite demonstrate your passion for medicine, why don’t you get more involved?

Question 2:

your grades are competitive, do you study all day and do nothing else ( basically alluding to question 1)? (Please, there is more to college than just study. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure that one out)

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

So, what’s so special about you? (I’m not kidding–he said it just like that)

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

hmmm, you have excellent grades but your mcats aren’t spectacular–tell me about that…didn’t you study enough? (by the way, my mcats are in the mid-30s)

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

What makes you think you’re ready for medicine?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

What are you looking for in a medical school.

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

If you were a colleague of an attending who intubated a woman whose family said she never would want this, what would you advise the attending to do?

Does she have a DNR? If not, legally, you would have to intubate her. If she does have a DNR, then stop intubating.

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

How does the hypothalamus communicate with the anterior pituitary? (this wasn’t a random question, it came up in conversation)

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

What I’d do if the hospital I did surgery at decide to switch to cheap prostheses that didn’t last for as many years.

Question 1:

Why do you want to be a doctor?

Question 2:

Questions about my extra-curriculars.

Question 3:

A few questions about my family (I think)

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

What can you tell me about the current situation involving the administration of BU med. (paraphrased)

Question 1:

Tell me about some of your non-medical extracurriculars during high school and college.

Question 2:

Tell me a little bit about yourself.

Question 1:

why did u pick ur major

Question 2:

what field of med u like

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

why medicine

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Have you been a mentor? (You have the file, does it say I’ve been a mentor?)

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

Why BU? After a day with the students and obnoxious admin people, I had a hard time faking that I wasn’t going to a better school I’d already been accepted to and was just coming to visit b/c I had the plane tix booked earlier.

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

What do you want to tell me about yourself? I know you get this all the time, but I really don’t like it.

Question 2:

Why do you want to come to BU?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

How would you change our healthcare system?

Question 1:

Why medical school?

Question 3:

Tell me about your research (followed by some tough follow up questions)!

Question 1:

What are you looking for in a medical school?

Question 2:

Tell me about your motivations in wanting to become a doctor.

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

ethics question..be prepared!

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Nothing too interesting. Every question was aimed at clarifying my activities.

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

Asked about a C I got in a structural biochem class.

Question 1:

What else would you like us to know about you?

Question 3:

Asked what I learned from my different experiences.

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

What do you like to draw?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

What are you looking for in a medical school?

1)      Location

2)      People

3)      Clinical Exposure

4)      The quality of education and research opportunities are comparable among all the medical colleges in the united states.

Question 3:

What do you feel you could offer the school?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Don’t you think that your mission is more political than medical. (I want to help homeless people get quality medical care.)

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

Choose an ethical dilemma in medicine today and explain what you will do in this situation.

Question 1:

Why did I choose my undergrad college?

Question 2:

What did I learn from my various experiences?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

what ethical situation have a dealt with?

Question 1:

Where do you see yourself personally/profesionally in the future?

Question 2:

What was the hardest time in your life and how did you deal with it?

Question 3:

Do you see research as part of your medical career? in what field? Why BU?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

A young woman has recently given birth and is now is a vegetative state. The family is thinking about stopping life support and seeks your advice. What do you do?

Question 3:

What do you do now?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

What do you see your career being like in the future? (How do you plan to balance your interests medicine, as well as personal life)

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

Tell me about an ethical/moral delimma.

Question 1:

Tell me about yourself.

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

(Briefly) You are an orthopaedic surgeon and have had 100% success with hip replacement X. The hospital administrators would like you to switch to hip replacement Y because it is 60% cheaper. What do you do?

Question 1:

Tell me about yourself. Tell me about some of your volunteer experiences.

Question 2:

What do you think about HMOs/current health care system?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

The interviewer had reviewed the wrong file, so since he did not know what to ask, his one question was “I am giving you open forum to tell me what you think I should know about you.”

Question 2:

Come up with an ethical situation and discuss it. If you can’t, I’ll give you one.

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Scenario question: if you had a disruptive patient who was a drug addict and needed regular dialysis, but threatened you and your colleagues, how would you handle the sitation?

Question 3:

Do you have questions for us?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Discuss the religious implications of in vitro fertilization in the context of patient treatment.

Question 2:

Do you like this area of Boston? [The area of Boston around the school is really nice, by the way.]

Question 3:

What do your parents do?

Question 1:

Tell me about your family

Question 2:

Why did you choose your undergrad. institution?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

compare us healthcare system to another

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

If you had to perform an operation on an AIDS infected individual, which could possibly infect you and/or your staff, would you perform the operation?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

What do you think of the current US healthcare system?

Question 1:

What is the worst thing about BU? (This one was easy, COST!)

Question 2:

What do you think of the current US healthcare system? Who is responsible for fixing it? Why are those people responsible, how do they affect it? (This question was rough, I was clueless for the most part, but my interviewer seemed to have some pretty interesting ideas about it. I was happy to hear his viewpoints because gave me some great insight.)

Question 3:

Tell me about (Fill in my name here)? Where is he from? What does he do? What motivates him? What was his childhood like?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

What would you do if, as a primary care physician, you had a 60 year old, HIV positive patient who still had promiscuous sex with unknowing partners?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

Where do you see yourself ten years from now?

Question 1:

Describe the research you are currently doing.

Question 2:

How will your upbringing influence the way you practice medicine?

Question 3:

What is the most challenging aspect of being a physician?

1)      Being forced to practice on the Insurance Companys allotted time per patient

2)      Law suits

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

What kind of political conflicts exist in [my homeland]?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

Projecting the U.S. healthcare situation ten years from now, what ethical problems do you predict that physicians of the future will be facing?

Question 1:

Why medicine?

Question 2:

What course did you take that exceeded your expectations? What course did not measure up to your expectations?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

If you had a young adult comatose patient and the family unanimous about taking him/her off life support, would you as a doctor pull the plug?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

In life our goals may sometime represent flames. With some people these flames can be blown out with the gust of a wind while with others they persist in the midst of a tornado. What events have represented the “winds” in your life and how do you feel you have grown from them?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

how do you feel healthcare should be fixed? Do you really think the government has the peoples best interest at heart?

Question 1:

what would you do if after treating a drug abuser for renal failure he returns 3 months later with irreversible kidney failure. Your only option is dialysis to which the patient later acts disrespectfully towards the nursing staff. The nurses approach you voicing their anger and want to leave. What is your responsibility to them, to the patient, and what would be your steps of action to address the situation?

Question 2:

Tell me about “insert name here”. What did you do in High school, college, now (i took a year off)

Question 3:

Think back 6-7 years. Discuss the activities you were in and highlight 2 that had the most significant impact on you and somehow changed the way you view life, or others.

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

What would you say was the most stressful time in your life?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

What ethical issues have you faced?

Question 1:

What kind of leadership have you exhibited?

Question 2:

Why BU? How did you go about your search for a medical school?

Question 3:

Is there anything I’m leaving out that you’d like me to mention to the admissions committee?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

How have you acted as a leader informally?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

How have you taught informally?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

What are some of the traditions at your undergrad school?

Question 1:

Why do you want to give back to your community using medicine?

Question 1:

Tell me about yourself, why you want to be a doctor, and why you want to come to BU. (Yes, they were ALL asked in one breath, 7 seconds after I sat down.)

Question 2:

How many uninsured are there in the US?

47 million and growing

Question 3:

How would you prioritize limited healthcare resources?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Asked about travels that I have done.

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

If you go into medicine, you’ll be giving up all these other options. Are you willing to do that?

Question 1:

Would you like to be a medical school teacher?

Question 2:

Do you speak any languages besides English?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Proposition 123 was voted on and passed in California denying illegal aliens access to health care. The proposition then went to the supreme court and it was reversed. What is your view on the issue?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

Tell me your viewpoing on managed health care. Before you answer that question do you think US health care is very good and should not be changed, is oaky but has some problems that need to be fixed, or is a total disaster and we need a new system. None of the questions were too challenging or unexpected.

Question 3:

He had me ask him questions at the very beginning. I was expecting that he would give me that time at the end.

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Who was the actress who played the orignal Becky on Roseanne? (I’m serious)

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Give me an ethical dilemma.

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

Can you think of other examples of the type of dilemma you’ve given?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

“I’m supposed to evaluate your ethical platform but I think scenarios seem forced. Describe a time you had to make a difficult ethical decision.”

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

“Aah, so rugby is what led to your famous ‘incident’; tell me about that.” OOPS!

Question 1:

After I described a time as a paramedic when I had to report errors of my supervisors, we talked for a while about preventing mistakes in medicine and taking pride in reporting errors.

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

what kind of teaching style i found most effective

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Who is your role model?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

What sorts of ethical issues have you been following? Tell me your story, what makes you special?

1)      Wall Street Journal article on artificial insemination surrogate mothers who were implanted with 5 embryos ended up having quintuplets.

Question 3:

What will you bring to the BU community?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

If I had to chose between using a more expensive, longer lasting hip replacement vs a cheaper, older model, on a limited budget, which would I pick and why?

1)      Theoretically, cost should never be a factor in providing medical care. Unfortunately, in reality, it almost always is. Do I provide fewer people with longer lasting hips or do I provide more people with cheaper hips? My moms an engineer who works as the technical support for CNBC and she is always praising how older model vcrs are far superior to newer models. The older vcrs had fewer moving parts, were made of metal and were very sturdy if this is the case with hips, then yes I would provide more people with cheaper hip replacement. If the older model compromised the health of the patient, then I would use the newer model.

Question 1:

What do you do in your spare time?

Question 2:

What are you reading?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

Do you think it’s ethical to have studies that offer a placebo? Why?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Why do you want to be in Boston?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

what was the most difficult situation you had to overcome/ how did you handle it/ etc… what were your teaching techniques at this hifgh school etc

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

What was a time you had to make an ethical decision and what did you do in that situation?

1)      Cheating on a test

2)      Cheating on homework

3)      Stealing

4)      Plagiarism

5)      Copyright infringement

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

What motivates you to get up in the morning?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

ethical question: Decide between giving $4000 treatment that was well-researched and known to work vs. giving a $2000 treatment that was not as well known or researched. Which treatment would you give your patients, given that the hospital CEO was pressuring you to give the new, cheaper treatment?

1)      Put yourself in the shoes of the patient. You would much rather have the $4000 treatment because it is well-researched and proven to work. It is my duty to my patients to inform them of exactly what they are getting into. I will give them the choice of the $4000 treatment and the $2000 treatment.

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Why should we accept you?

Question 3:

Give me a brief summary of your life

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

16 year old wants abortion, doesn’t want parents to know, what do you do?

Question 3:

what has prepared you to deal with tough decisions?

Question 1:

What do you think of how healthcare is delivered today? Do you think that the system works, needs a litle fixing, or should be thrown out in favor of systems like the ones in Canada and England?

Question 2:

Some years ago, Californians passed a proposition denying health care and education to illegal immigrants. (It was eventually overturned by courts). What do you think about that?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

If you were a farmer that needed $35 to pay for an ox, or one of your family members would die, would you sell your youngest daughter?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Discuss my actions as a physician if I witness a doctor treat a patient who verbally informed her family and doctor that she does not want to be treated.

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

The above question and Opinion on a poor family dying from starvation whose only hope for survival was to sell their 13 year old daughter to prostitution.

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Cultural challenges of medicine?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Tell me an ethical situation that you went through and how you dealt with it. [You’ll definitely get a ethics question, so bring your morals with you]

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

Why do you want to come to BU?

Question 2:

Can you give adequate time to the patient in 15 minute visit?

What was the most difficult question you were asked:

Why is it that when my daughter is out of school for three days, she gets a phone call from the school, but when I don’t see a doctor for three years, nobody cares?

Question 1:

tell me about yourself– your heritage, where you’re from, college, etc.

Question 2:

Do you think that the system can sustain itself for much longer?

Question 3:

So what will really happen– will we change things, or will the medical system keep tottering on?

What was the most interesting question you were asked:

In rural areas of Indonesia, subsistence farming is the norm. Families often depend on an ox to provide for their livelihood; if the ox were to die, families usually don’t have the resources to replace it since it costs $35, which is equivalent to $1,000,000 for us. Without the ox, at least one member of the family will certainly die. The only way to get this money is to sell your daughter to become a prostitute in the city. You are the father in this family, so what do you do?

Comments are closed