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Heads, you Win–Lab Report

Heads, You Win

Purpose: To find out how many drops of water and soapy water fit onto the heads side of a clean penny before it overflows.

Hypothesis: If there are plain water droplets, then there would be 17 droplets altogether that will fit on the surface of the penny.

If there are soapy water droplets, then there would be 15 droplets altogether that will fit on the surface of the penny.

If the plain water droplets take up less space on the surface of the penny, then the soapy water will take up more space.

Materials: Beaker filled with plain water

Beaker filled with detergent water

Pipette

Penny

Paper Towels

Dish Detergent

 

Procedure: 1. First, set up your station by getting everything out of the way on a sturdy table

2. Then, put a paper towel with a clean, dry penny on it

3. After that, drop plain water with the pipette on the heads side of the penny

4. Count/record how many drops that is takes before the drops overflow for the first time

5. Now do four more trials (total of five)

6. Then, drop the soapy water with the pipette on the heads side of the penny

7. Count/record the amount of drops it takes before the water overflows

8. Now do four more trials (total of five)

 

Observations: Here is my data for the amount of times it took for the water to overflow from the surface of the penny.

 

Trial Number Plain Water Soapy Water
1 21 11
2 23 12
3 25 11
4 15 10
5 26 11
Average 22 11

 

My observations are that when the water was dropped, there was a slight bubble forming. Each time the water was dropped, it vibrated as if it were going to break.

Answers to Questions:

Q: How many drops of water fit on a penny? Does the kind of water make a difference? Does soapy water behave differently from non soapy water? Suggest a reason for your observations (suggest a reason why soapy water was different).

A: The average of the drops of water that fit on the penny was 22. The kind of water makes a difference. Soapy water behaves differently from non soapy water. My reason for my observations is that soapy water takes up more space and matter than water. The soapy water droplets don’t stack on top of each other like plain water droplets do. Instead, soapy water droplets just go next to each other instead of on top, which causes it to take up more space. Another thing is that the bubbles from the soapy water could take some space up.

 

Q: Do you think other elements, such as salt or sugar or oil would affect the number of drops that could fit on a penny? How would you test this hypothesis?

A: Yes I think other elements would affect the number of drops that could fit on a penny. I could test this hypothesis by adding the same amount of each to different beakers of water. Then, I would drop the water onto the penny with a pipette. I would think that probably the oil would take up the most space because it blends in with the liquid and spreads out.

 

Conclusions: Since the soapy water has soap in it, it would take up more space on the penny than the plain water; we can conclude that materials added to water will take up more space that plain old water. The hypothesis that I made for the amount of droplets that would fit on the surface of the penny was pretty close and the hypothesis about the plain water taking less space was correct too. The Things I learned include that a penny can hold a lot of plain water on its surface and that soap takes up more space and doesn’t bunch up so easily.

 

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