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Letter E

Letter E

Purpose: To find out how the microscope works, how the microscope magnifies, and the parts of a microscope by observing the letter e.

 

Hypothesis: If I move the letter e to one direction, then it will look like it went the opposite direction when viewed with the microscope.

If I put the letter e onto the microscope, then it will just be magnified in normal reading position.

Materials: Compound Microscope

Microscope Slide

Dropper

Cover Slip

Water

Letter e

 

Procedures: 1. Cut a letter e or print out one and then make a wet-mount slide. The e should be in the normal reading position.

-By making a wet-mount slide, follow the directions from 2 to 4:

2. Then, drop a droplet of water onto the e.

3. After that, place a clean cover slip on top of the slide.

4. If there are any air bubbles trapped around the e, tap it with the end of a pencil or your fingernail until they move to the side and are released.

 

5. Then, look at the letter e and draw a picture of it without magnification. (Observation A)

6. Now, put the slide onto the microscope stage and put it so that the light is shining on it and over the center of the stage opening.

7. Next, put the stage clips on to fasten it securely.

8. Look through the eyepiece and focus the e into view.

9. Draw the letter as you see it under low-power magnification. (Observation B)

10. In order to switch to the high-power objective, revolve the nosepiece so that the high-power objective lens clicks into place.

11. Then, look through the eyepiece and focus the letter e into view.

12. If it is blurry and you cant get it right, try to first switch it onto medium-power lens objective and focus the letter e into view. Also, make sure that the pointer (the black arrow) is on the place that you want to view. If it isnt, try moving the slide until its in the right place.

13. After getting the letter e into view with the high-power lens, draw a picture of what it looks like. (Observation C)

 

Observations: Here are my drawings for the view of the letter e

A.

 

 

 

 

 

B.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some observations are that I saw many blobs of ink for the magnification of 400x. It was very big and it was very detailed. Also, it changed a big deal from being a regular letter e to being a monstrous blob of black stuff.

 

 

 

Answers to Questions:

 

Q #1: What is the position of the letter e when viewed with the microscope compared to its position on the stage?

A: The letter e is upside down when viewed with the microscope rather than the regular right side up viewed on the stage.

Q #2: While looking through the eyepiece, move the slide slowly to the RIGHT. In what direction does the letter e move as seen through the microscope?

A: The letter e moves to the left when viewed through the microscope when you move it right.

Q #3: While looking through the eyepiece, move the slide slowly to the LEFT. In what direction does the letter e move as seen through the microscope?

A: The letter e moves to the right when viewed through the microscope when you move it left.

Q #4: While looking through the eyepiece, move the slide slowly toward you. In what direction does the letter e move as seen through the microscope?

A: The letter e moves up when viewed through the microscope when you move it toward you.

Q #5: How does the ink that was used to print the letter differ in appearance when you see it with your eye from the way it appears under the microscope?

A: The ink differs because there are different dots and cracks in the print. The letter e was printed with a dot matrix printer since there are blobs of ink. If it were a laser printer, it would have lines going through it. When you see it up close, it is much more detailed and magnified than when you see it with your eye.

 

Conclusions: This lab was a very interesting one. I learned that when you move something to the right, it moves to the left when you see it through the microscope. In other words, it moves the opposite direction to where you move it when viewed through the microscope. I also learned how much a microscope can magnify and how much more detailed something can be when its viewed with the high-power lens. It was interesting how when you magnify something, you see so much more than your eye can see.

 

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